Angels Camp

The City of Angels is steeped in Gold Rush history and its Main Street retains the old store-front appeal of the 1800's. Originally started as a mining camp during the California Gold Rush, Angels camp transitioned to a trade post, then to a mill town -- where gold stamp mills worked -- before finally becoming the historical town it is today. Antique shops, art galleries, small cafes, Angels Camp Museum with blacksmith shop and Carriage House, and Utica Park provide for a relaxing and interesting walking tour.

The immense reservoir, New Melones Lake offers exceptional fishing, boating, water skiing, wakeboarding and swimming opportunities.Greenhorn Creek Golf Course, and nearby Saddle Creek Golf Course provide world class golfing. Angels Camp is ideally located just minutes from Lake Tulloch, wineries, caverns, Calaveras Big Trees State Park, alpine lakes and Bear Valley Ski Resort. The Bay Area and Sacramento are just 2 hours away.

The quality of education is a factor in the value of real estate in any area. The schools of Angels Camp don’t suffer because the town is small. On the contrary, the sense of community you get in Angels Camp extended to the belief that better educated residents will make for a better society. Angels Camp is served by the Bret Harte Union High School District and the Mark Twain Union Elementary school district. There are three elementary schools, five middle schools and three high schools in the area, as well as the Christian Family Learning Center, a private K-8 school.

Angels Camp was founded in 1848 by Henry Angel. In 1865, Mark Twain's story "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County" put Angels Camp on the map, nationwide. Visitors may view the "Frog Hop of Fame," where brass plaques commemorate past frog jump winners. In fact, you are likely to see frogs--collectibles, art, ads, tees--most everywhere in Angels. Angels Camp is home to the annual Calaveras County Fair & Frog Jumping Jubilee, held the third weekend in May at the Fairgrounds. This event captures headlines worldwide and draws visitors from near and far.The world record belongs to Rosie the Ribeter with a jump of 21 feet and 5 3/4 inches.